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My name is Sylwia, but you can call me Mizu (it's because of my last name, not because I like water...).

I live in Poland. Warsaw, to be precise.
I love cute fluffy stuff and rock music.
I'm quite sporty. But only when the weather is nice.
I love travelling. I can be easily packed into a suitcase and taken with you to your country.
I'm keen on art. I draw and photograph.

I'm interested in many things, so there is a high chance that we have something in common!

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Lexicalized concepts.

Posted 1 year ago with 329,280 notes
ViaSource

#lexicalized concepts #language
English - deal with it.

English - deal with it.

1,295,557 plays

rhapsody-tardisblue:

c-lov3r:

taintedsound:

taureanproject:ask-changeling-lyra:

A quick audio lesson on Southern Linguistics.

Press play. Trust me on this one.

I love linguistics 

Bless.

image

omg I knew that about the British and French because one time I had an audition and I was supposed to have a Georgia Southern accent and I kept slowly slipping into British. and my mom used to work with this sexy man who had a Bayou accent

reason why I want to study linguistics *w*

Posted 1 year ago with 263,045 notes
ViaSource

#yay #language #american #english

The fact that, contrary to a popular belief, “iron” is pronounced not like /’aɪron/, but like /’aɪə(r)n/ continues to cause a stir among my students. 

"But… On tv they always say /’aɪron mɛn/!"

Yeah. They also say /’polant/ instead of /’pʰoʊlənd/.

Yes, you can hear words from the second line almost only in animes and dramas :)

Yes, you can hear words from the second line almost only in animes and dramas :)

Posted 2 years ago with 1,077 notes
ViaSource

#japanese #language #japan #vocabulary

Not many people know that the English word “spruce” (name of a tree) comes from the Polish language. When Polish merchants were selling wood of this tree to England in 15th century, they were saying that it was “z Prus”, which means “from Prussia”, because this was where they were getting the timber from. When the English heard how the Polish were calling it, they started calling this tree in the same way - and that’s how they came up with “spruce”.

itotallyrelate:

It’s not always true. Like in my case, at least in my opinion. I can hear my accent when I sing in foreign languages (which are German, English, Japanese and sometimes Korean, but I always have my own version of Korean lyrics XD Also Spanish songs happen to me now and then. And Ai Se Eu Te Pego :D).

However, my friend has a terrible accent when he speaks English. Actually it’s not only about accent, it is about his, I don’t know, mouth problems? XD He just can’t say anything properly because his mouth and his tongue get twisted… somehow. He seems to be simply unable to form English (and not only English, but also German) words. But when he sings, you can actually make out the words! (which is not so easy when he speaks).

learnpolishwithada:

Hilarious! The ultimate translation fail in Polish Airlines LOT :)
Pieprz means “pepper” in standard Polish. However in Polish colloquial language “pieprz” is imperative form of “pieprzyć” which means… “to fuck”. 
mow-mi-tysia:

OMG.
To non-Polish followers: This is what Polish Airlines give to their passangers. The first word mean “pepper” in Polish. The word below was supposed to be translation to English.
Once again: OMG.


Omg, really? AHAHAHAHAHA. Jesus…
If someone doesn’t know Polish, and sees such a package entitled “FUCK”, at first they may think it’s a condom! XDDD

learnpolishwithada:

Hilarious! The ultimate translation fail in Polish Airlines LOT :)

Pieprz means “pepper” in standard Polish. However in Polish colloquial language “pieprz” is imperative form of “pieprzyć” which means… “to fuck”. 

mow-mi-tysia:

OMG.

To non-Polish followers: This is what Polish Airlines give to their passangers. The first word mean “pepper” in Polish. The word below was supposed to be translation to English.

Once again: OMG.

Omg, really? AHAHAHAHAHA. Jesus…

If someone doesn’t know Polish, and sees such a package entitled “FUCK”, at first they may think it’s a condom! XDDD

Today I saw the abbreviation “PIPA” somewhere in the internet and I giggled. Why? Because the word “pipa” is in Polish a “cute” (and rather funny) way of describing a pussy (and by this I don’t mean “a small cat”). It’s pronounced “peepah”.

Hee hee hee.

The British had the same problem when the public eye focused on Prince William’s marriage with Kate Middleton. The problematic part was her sister, Pippa Middleton, who (for some time) was even more popular with the public than Kate. We had much fun in Poland, there were many, well, indecent jokes about Pippa and her name. Newscasters on tv had slightly uncertain faces when they had to say something about her. I appreciated their efforts to hide the amusement, but they couldn’t suppress smiling. Today the topic of SOPA and PIPA is inevitably going to emerge in the evening news. I wonder how they will pronounce it. If it will be the Polish way, then it’s “peepah” - and everybody will laugh again.

PIPA stands for Protect IP Act, and “IP” stands for “intellectual property”. Of course.

Posted 2 years ago with 93,927 notes
ViaSource

#language #languages #english #polish #polski #funny #game
Exactly! Half of the things I learned about English at school is useless when talking to a native…

Exactly! Half of the things I learned about English at school is useless when talking to a native…

English:

Polish:

crushisaband:

  • Japanese: pan (noun) - bread
  • Polish: pan (noun) - mister, lord (in “my lord” and also meaning “God”), master of a dog, gentleman, sir
  • English: pan (noun) - A skillet used for frying, searing, and browning foods. (verb) - To search for gold, using a technique where rocks (mixed with the occasional ingot) are all examined in a tray used for sifting. Commonly associated with the California Gold Rush of 1849

Right, how could I forget about FRYING PAN? *facepalm*

I have to start thinking, school is coming after all! D:

  • Japanese: pan (noun) - bread
  • Polish: pan (noun) - mister, lord (in “my lord” and also meaning “God”), master of a dog, gentleman, sir